• A section of a watercolour painting created in stages as a demonstration during a class A section of a watercolour painting created in stages as a demonstration during a class
  • Part of a watercolour of a beach scene painted in class as a demonstration Part of a watercolour of a beach scene painted in class as a demonstration
  • A section of an example painting created in only two colours during a class A section of an example painting created in only two colours during a class
  • Part of a watercolour nature study of found leaves and branches Part of a watercolour nature study of found leaves and branches
  • One of the many example paintings done in demonstration during a class One of the many example paintings done in demonstration during a class
  • Part of a watercolour of a sunset painted in class as a demonstration Part of a watercolour of a sunset painted in class as a demonstration

Autumn Array Project - Student Gallery

Autumn is the season of colour, movement, shape and texture. It is a feast of Autumnal delight, so much colour, reddish-browns, purples, golden-browns to name a few. The leaves melt into a fiery display that rivals the best of New England.
We can celebrate this wonderful season by engaging in the act of painting. Mixing these soft, warm and vibrant colours that surround us at this time of the year. We can think about warmer colours next to cooler colours and darker tones next to lighter tones. Make this an opportunity to experiment with different techniques to try and capture the various surface qualities such as textures and patterns. Experiment with your paint brushes. You will be surprised at what a variety of marks you can make with just one brush, never mind several brushes.
We don’t have to confine ourselves to brushes alone. Why not try other mark making devices such as a palette knife for laying on the paint, or for scraping it off!  Dabbing and daubing with a sponge or some kitchen towel can create an interesting effect.
Basically anything that creates a mark is worth trying. You never know what discoveries you may find through experimenting. These discoveries may lend themselves to the textures and patterns that you might find in your autumn garden.
You may just want to make your mark through some observational drawing. Why not draw a corner of your garden or a view through the window. Then if you wanted to take it a step further, you could lay over a wash of watercolour paint to bring your drawing to life! If you’re lucky enough to live in the countryside, it can be fun to head out for an autumn walk and stop to paint what you see, while you’re there you could take a photograph to work on in the comfort of your own home. When the air starts to turn chilly and the leaves are turning golden, we love to settle in for a cosy painting session to create beautiful works of art.
Why not have a go at painting nature studies, such as; acorns, autumn fruits, field maple, horse chestnuts, sycamore leaves, thistle down. You may prefer to paint autumn flowers such as; Chinese Lanterns, Dahlias, Geraniums, Lilies, Orchids, Japanese Anemones.
Artists you may like to look at for inspiration, who have painted themes at this time of the year; Autumn on the Seine (Claude Monet), Autumn, Portrait of Lydia Cassatt (Mary Cassatt), The Mulberry Tree in Autumn (Vincent Van Gogh), Autumn Leaves (Yokohama Taiwan), Near Mstyora, Golden Autumn (Kim Briton), Autumn Leaves (David Hockney).

Submitting your artwork into the Student Gallery is easier than you might think.
Scroll upwards below any picture in Student Gallery, put your details in, click Choose File button, take photo of your artwork with the device you’re using, click on Submit your artwork- DONE !

Submit your own artwork to be part of this gallery!